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Video access to class meetings or course material will be critical for student success during a semester when some courses may be held in-person, others with a mix of in-person and remote learning, and others still with an entirely remote audience on the spectrum between synchronous and asynchronous formats. All of these options can be confusing, either because they're unfamiliar or because they seem to overlap and confound our sense of a "best" choice. Please do take advantage of our virtual office hours, or send us a message to arrange for a conversation (teachanywhere@uky.edu). As a starting point, use the options below to narrow the field and make informed decisions:

It's also important to make sure you know about the hardware installed in your classroom. See the lists of Echo360 classrooms and Zoom/Teams classrooms.

Storing Video Sustainably

six film reels in boxes

Beginning on 3/1/2021, Zoom Cloud recordings will be automatically deleted after six months—this includes recordings made prior to that date. If you want to preserve Zoom recordings for future use, move them to Yuja, UK's video hosting platform. See the links here for information on retrieving, uploading, and saving recordings for long-term use. If it's unlikely that a recording will be useful beyond the current semester, you can leave it on Zoom Cloud for deletion.

Live-Stream Class Meetings from Campus

For courses that will meet at least partially on campus, but with a number of students who at any given time must "attend" class remotely, an instructor may choose to broadcast class meetings live for remote students to watch and participate. Note that all options here include the ability to record the video for instructors to link/embed via Canvas for later viewing. This video format may work best for courses that:

  • rely on "front of room" instructor presence, presentation, or lecture
  • rely on the live (synchronous) class meeting for content delivery and/or student engagement
  • mix synchronous attendance and participation among both remote and in-person students
  • do not have challenges with time zones or competing schedules for remote students
  • are held in rooms with hardware capable of live broadcasting

Personal Laptop

Summary

The most flexible and DIY option for live-streaming a course, this involves hosting a videoconference (e.g., via Zoom or Teams) via either a laptop or the classroom's built-in computer.

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

If the classroom does not have Echo360 nor Panoramic Camera hardware installed (or if you prefer not to use it), you may still broadcast class meetings using a personal laptop and videoconference software such as Zoom or Microsoft Teams. In this case, the hardware setup is less complicated, involving placing the laptop where the instructor can access it comfortably while also giving a clear view of the front of the room. It's advisable always to connect directly to a power source to avoid accidental battery drain/shutdown, and to close out of unnecessary applications that compete for processing and memory bandwidth.

Peripherals can enhance this setup in the way of (1) an external webcam that frees the laptop itself and is positioned to catch a wider view of the classroom (thus allowing for more instructor mobility), and (2) an external microphone such as a lapel mic that, again, allows for instructor mobility and more clarity/quality of sound (with a reduction in the ambient noise that a laptop microphone detects). Regardless of setup, student questions and comments will likely need to be repeated if remote participants are to hear them clearly. NB: an external webcam and instructor mic allow for streaming/recording the class via the classroom's built-in desktop computer, as well.

Software Choices & Capabilities

Zoom and Microsoft Teams (see our tools page) allow for videoconference streaming of in-person classes. Both share similar functionalities; the choice depends largely on personal preference and, to a certain degree, class management needs. In terms of similarities, both platforms allow for video and audio streaming, live chat features, file sharing, screen sharing, and virtual whiteboard. Both are free of charge to UK students, staff, and faculty. Recent security updates in Zoom have responded to issues that emerged early in the transition to remote learning (e.g., "Zoombombing").

In terms of differences, Zoom may represent more of a quick-and-easy way to host video streams, while the video capability of Teams is part of a more robust platform that allows for collaboration in a way that combines aspects of Google Drive and Slack. A clear advantage for Teams is accessibility, as it offers live auto-captioning while Zoom does not. Zoom streams can be captioned after the fact, however, once they are uploaded into Yuja and auto-captioned (and manually corrected) there. (NB: Zoom Cloud recordings allow for auto-captioning and transcript generation [i.e., a separate text file] after a meeting has concluded. However, Zoom Cloud is not an ideal long-term storage location for course videos.)

instructor at the front of a class teaches distanced students while broadcasting on a laptop

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Engagement and Class Management

For larger classes, it may make more sense to use the text-based chat feature exclusively for remote student engagement given the complexities of managing audio/video channels. These sorts of expectations ought to be explained clearly in the syllabus and at regular intervals during the semester. Smaller classes may elect to use both text and audio/video channels given that students have been prepared for structured ways of interacting. For example, the expectation might be set that an instructor will cue opportunities for verbal questions/comments, and manage the discussion using the "raise hand" feature in the participant list. Moreover, small group discussions may be held in parallel, with in-person students forming (physically distant) groups if the room allows (an important caveat) while remote students are sent into breakout rooms for their own discussions.

In both large and small classes it can be difficult to multitask between attending to the physical room and attending to the virtual room. The instructor can take pauses at regular intervals to check the chat for questions and participant list for raised hands. If the course has a TA, the TA can monitor the chat and list, perhaps responding to some text-based questions in the moment without instructor intervention and bringing other questions to the group's attention during the appropriate times. If the course has no TA, consider establishing a system of rotating responsibility for monitoring the chat and participant list, either by individual students or in small groups, as part of class participation. Either way, encouraging students, both remote and in person, to respond to each other in the chat (as a sort of public backchannel) and to think of themselves as each other's advocates can bolster engagement and community in the class.

Ongoing Storage and Access

If class meetings are recorded, the video file can be uploaded to Yuja for students to review for assessments or catch up on if they missed class. Yuja allows for auto-captioning and manual correction, and its videos can be embedded directly in Canvas.

Echo360 Classroom Capture

Summary

If the classroom has the Echo360 hardware installed, and the need for video recording does not extend beyond broadcasting/recording the class meeting, this option can be low maintenance in the long run with a bit of setup at the front end to schedule the recordings and link students to them on Canvas. 

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

The Echo360 camera is placed in a fixed position, usually at the back of the room, looking forward to the front of the room. If your classroom has the Echo360 hardware, you may choose to broadcast your class live using this appliance. (NB: in the list, asterisks designate rooms that capture only audio and the computer screen, with no video of the physical room.) As opposed to broadcasting from a personal device at the front of the room (e.g., laptop), video-capable Echo360 covers a wide angle and allows an instructor to move around the room without leaving the frame. At the same time, the camera's distance can minimize instructor presence and create a "back of the room" feel for remote viewers. In most cases the instructor will be the only one with a microphone setup and will need to repeat student questions and comments for remote participants.

Account Setup & Capabilities

Setup for Echo360 can initially feel more complex than other platforms. To set up your Echo360 account and schedule the recording and live stream, it's best to work with your college IT administrator(s); Echo360 always records the class meeting, and the live streaming option is a toggle (yes/no) when scheduling the recording. Echo360 live streaming allows for a certain amount of remote student engagement via polling and "activity slides." At the same time, you're not limited to using only the functionality of the Echo360 platform; a wide range of apps and virtual resources can facilitate student participation and interaction.

Student Engagement & Class Management

Echo360 Live Streaming allows for students to submit questions and respond to others (the instructor, too, can do this). While the interface adds a step or two, it functions basically like a typical chat that one would encounter in other video software like Zoom and Teams. The chat represents a critical way that students both in the room and participating remotely can engage with the instructor, the material, and each other.

In both large and small classes it can be difficult to multitask between attending to the physical room and attending to the virtual room. The instructor can take pauses at regular intervals to check the chat for questions. If the course has a TA, the TA can monitor the chat, perhaps responding to some questions in the moment without instructor intervention and bringing other questions to the group's attention during the appropriate times. If the course has no TA, consider establishing a system of rotating responsibility for monitoring the chat, either by individual  students or in small groups, as part of class participation. Either way, encouraging students, both remote and in person, to respond to each other in the chat (as a sort of public backchannel) and to think of themselves as each other's advocates can bolster engagement and community in the class.

Canvas Integration

Echo360 can be added as a Canvas link by clicking on the "Settings" tab in the left-side menu, and then the "Navigation" tab in the resulting top-page menu. You'll find the "Echo ALP" link under the deactivated category, and can activate it by clicking on the three vertical dots and selecting the "activate" option. Once activated, instructors need to connect the Canvas course with the Echo course (see this step-by-step guide). Now, students can see the link in their left-side menu and from this view all Echo360 recordings for the class. (If students are using Safari on an iPad to access Echo360, they may need to check these settings.)

See below for an Echo360 sponsored webinar led by UK's Holly Hapke, who has used the platform for years to teach her "mega" large enrollment marketing course using a hybrid-flexible format.

slide from Echo360 webinar showing holly hapke's picture and webinar agenda

 

 

 

 

 

Mounted Panoramic Camera

Summary

If the class is held in a room with mounted panoramic cameras, these can be used to augment videoconference streaming via the classroom's built-in desktop computer and platforms such as Zoom or Teams (i.e., in place of a webcam or laptop camera). Note that this is a new hardware installation at UK and has not been tested in real-time conditions.

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

A small number of classrooms on campus are outfitted with panoramic cameras mounted on the edge of the lectern or instructor/computer desk at the front of the room (see the list here). These cameras automatically swivel to a certain degree, based on the directionality of the audio input; i.e., if the instructor is speaking, the camera faces forward, and if a student asks a question or makes a comment, the camera turns to face the student. At the moment, this feature cannot be switched off, e.g., to fix the camera on the instructor.

The cameras are connected directly to the built-in desktop computers and cannot be plugged into personal laptops. Instructors can project from the desktop while also using the Panoramic camera to broadcast the class.

Software Choices & Capabilities

Zoom and Microsoft Teams (see our tools page) allow for videoconference streaming of in-person classes. Both share similar functionalities; the choice depends largely on personal preference and, to a certain degree, class management needs. In terms of similarities, both platforms allow for video and audio streaming, live chat features, file sharing, screen sharing, and virtual whiteboard. Both are free of charge to UK students, staff, and faculty. Recent security updates in Zoom have responded to issues that emerged early in the transition to remote learning (e.g., "Zoombombing").

In terms of differences, Zoom may represent more of a quick-and-easy way to host video streams, while the video capability of Teams is part of a more robust platform that allows for collaboration in a way that combines aspects of Google Drive and Slack. A clear advantage for Teams is accessibility, as it offers live auto-captioning while Zoom does not. Zoom streams can be captioned after the fact, however, once they are uploaded into Yuja and auto-captioned (and manually corrected) there. (NB: Zoom Cloud recordings allow for auto-captioning and transcript generation [i.e., a separate text file] after a meeting has concluded. However, Zoom Cloud is not an ideal long-term storage location for course videos.)

Rather than projecting from the built-in desktop (e.g., slides) while also sharing the screen and broadcasting via Zoom or Teams, it is easier to manage with a separate device such as a laptop or tablet logged into the videoconference so that the chat and participant list can be monitored (otherwise, these would be blocking the projected material from the desktop).

Student Engagement and Class Management

For larger classes, it may make more sense to use the text-based chat feature exclusively for remote student engagement given the complexities of managing audio/video channels. These sorts of expectations ought to be explained clearly in the syllabus and at regular intervals during the semester. Smaller classes may elect to use both text and audio/video channels given that students have been prepared for structured ways of interacting. For example, the expectation might be set that an instructor will cue opportunities for verbal questions/comments, and manage the discussion using the "raise hand" feature in the participant list. Moreover, small group discussions may be held in parallel, with in-person students forming (physically distant) groups if the room allows (an important caveat) while remote students are sent into breakout rooms for their own discussions.

In both large and small classes it can be difficult to multitask between attending to the physical room and attending to the virtual room. The instructor can take pauses at regular intervals to check the chat for questions and participant list for raised hands. If the course has a TA, the TA can monitor the chat and list, perhaps responding to some text-based questions in the moment without instructor intervention and bringing other questions to the group's attention during the appropriate times. If the course has no TA, consider establishing a system of rotating responsibility for monitoring the chat and participant list, either by individual students or in small groups, as part of class participation. Either way, encouraging students, both remote and in person, to respond to each other in the chat (as a sort of public backchannel) and to think of themselves as each other's advocates can bolster engagement and community in the class.

Ongoing Storage and Access

If class meetings are recorded, the video file can be uploaded to Yuja for students to review for assessments or catch up on if they missed class. Yuja allows for auto-captioning and manual correction, and its videos can be embedded directly in Canvas. NB: if the instructor uses Zoom and records the class meeting, they should record to the Zoom Cloud in order to avoid having to wait in the classroom as the recording compiling locally on the desktop computer. (When "record" is selected, these two options are presented.)

view from the panoramic camera of instructor and students in room

Record Class Meetings from Campus for Later Viewing

For courses that will meet at least partially on campus, an instructor may choose to record in-person class meetings for students to view and review remotely. This video format may work best for courses (or portions of class meetings) that:

  • rely on "front of room" instructor presence, presentation, or lecture
  • rely on live (synchronous) class meetings for content delivery, but do not require remote participation or engagement during synchronous meetings
  • benefit from students being able to review class meetings (e.g., for an exam, for missed class meetings)
  • involve students in different times zones, with scheduling difficulties, or who encounter barriers to attending class meetings in person
  • are held in rooms with hardware capable of recording video

Personal Laptop

Summary

The most DIY option for recording a class meeting, this involves recording an empty videoconference session (e.g., via Zoom) or recording directly into Yuja on a laptop. This may be more appropriate for smaller courses because of the limited audio pickup and visual frame, but these can be enhanced with a webcam and microphone.

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

If the classroom does not have Echo360 nor Panoramic Camera hardware installed (or if you prefer not to use it), you may still record using a personal laptop and videoconference software such as Zoom, or with UK's Yuja video platform. In this case, the hardware setup is less complicated, involving placing the laptop where the instructor can access it comfortably while also giving a clear view of the front of the room. It's advisable always to connect directly to a power source to avoid accidental battery drain/shutdown, and to close out of unnecessary applications that compete for processing and memory bandwidth.

Peripherals can enhance this setup in the way of (1) an external webcam that frees the laptop itself and is positioned to catch a wider view of the classroom (thus allowing for more instructor mobility), and (2) an external microphone such as a lapel mic that, again, allows for instructor mobility and more clarity/quality of sound (with a reduction in the ambient noise that a laptop microphone detects). Regardless of setup, student questions and comments will likely need to be repeated if viewers are to hear them clearly. NB: an external webcam and instructor mic may allow for recording the class via the classroom's built-in desktop computer, as well.

Software Choices & Capabilities

Zoom (see our tools page) allows for recording videoconference sessions. To record a session via Zoom, an instructor would need only to start a meeting without inviting anyone else and hit the "record" button at the bottom of the screen. Zoom recordings can be captioned after the fact, once they are uploaded into Yuja and auto-captioned (and manually corrected) there. (NB: Zoom Cloud recordings allow for auto-captioning and transcript generation [i.e., a separate text file] after a meeting has concluded. However, Zoom Cloud is not an ideal long-term storage location for course videos.)

Software such as Quicktime allows for video and audio recording; however, the file size that Quicktime generates is prohibitively large for manipulation and uploading. The compressed format of Zoom results in much, much quicker processing and upload times. Quicktime and similar programs are more ideal when recording an asynchronous lesson in shorter segments (e.g., 10 minutes or less) that benefit from higher quality resolution.

Yuja, UK's video hosting platform, also allows for recordings to be made directly onto the platform (skipping the upload step). Once logged in with their linkblue, instructors can click "create recording" at the top of the screen and will need to complete a one-time download/install of the Yuja software. After that, the Yuja Software Capture screen will open on the instructor's computer, form which they may customize recording options.

Class Management for Later Viewing

Instructors may choose to record the computer screen with slides, the classroom itself, or a mix of both during the class meeting. (It's always recommended to let students know ahead of time how recordings will be made.) If students ask questions or make comments, it's best to repeat them for the recording. Should a portion of the class be devoted to individual or small group work, the instructor can stop the recording and wait until the appropriate time to make a new one, thus creating smaller, separate files as opposed to a large file with a good amount of unusable footage in it.

Ongoing Storage and Access

If class meetings are recorded, the video file can be uploaded to (or recorded directly in) Yuja for students to review for assessments or catch up on if they missed class. Yuja allows for auto-captioning and manual correction, and its videos can be embedded directly in Canvas.

Echo360 Classroom Capture

Summary

If the classroom has the Echo360 hardware installed, and the need for video recording does not extend beyond a basic recording the class meeting, this option can be low maintenance in the long run with a bit of setup at the front end to schedule the recordings and link students to them on Canvas. 

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

The Echo360 camera is placed in a fixed position, usually at the back of the room, looking forward to the front of the room. If your classroom has the Echo360 hardware, you may choose to broadcast your class live using this appliance. (NB: in the list, asterisks designate rooms that capture only audio and the computer screen, with no video of the physical room.) As opposed to broadcasting from a personal device at the front of the room (e.g., laptop), video-capable Echo360 covers a wide angle and allows an instructor to move around the room without leaving the frame. At the same time, the camera's distance can minimize instructor presence and create a "back of the room" feel for viewers. In most cases the instructor will be the only one with a microphone setup and will need to repeat student questions and comments for remote participants.

Account Setup & Capabilities

Setup for Echo360 can initially feel more complex than other platforms. To set up your Echo360 account and schedule the recording, it's best to work with your college IT administrator(s); Echo360 always records the class meeting, and the live streaming option is a toggle (yes/no) when scheduling the recording.

Class Management for Later Viewing

Instructors may choose to record the computer screen with slides, the classroom itself, or a mix of both during the class meeting. (It's always recommended to let students know ahead of time how recordings will be made.) If students ask questions or make comments, it's best to repeat them for the recording.

Canvas Integration

Echo360 can be added as a Canvas link by clicking on the "Settings" tab in the left-side menu, and then the "Navigation" tab in the resulting top-page menu. You'll find the "Echo ALP" link under the deactivated category, and can activate it by clicking on the three vertical dots and selecting the "activate" option. Once activated, instructors need to connect the Canvas course with the Echo course (see this step-by-step guide). Now, students can see the link in their left-side menu and from this view all Echo360 recordings for the class. (If students are using Safari on an iPad to access Echo360, they may need to check these settings.)

Mounted Panoramic Cameras

Summary

If the class is held in a room with mounted panoramic cameras, these can be used to augment videoconference recording via the classroom's built-in desktop computer and platforms such as Zoom or Teams (i.e., in place of a webcam or laptop camera). Note that this is a new hardware installation at UK and has not been tested in real-time conditions. Particularly for recordings of class meetings (i.e., not a live broadcast), it may make more sense to use a personal device given the constraints of the hardware.

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

A small number of classrooms on campus are outfitted with panoramic cameras mounted on the edge of the lectern or instructor/computer desk at the front of the room (see the list here). These cameras automatically swivel to a certain degree, based on the directionality of the audio input; i.e., if the instructor is speaking, the camera faces forward, and if a student asks a question or makes a comment, the camera turns to face the student. At the moment, this feature cannot be switched off, e.g., to fix the camera on the instructor.

The cameras are connected directly to the built-in desktop computers and cannot be plugged into personal laptops. Instructors can project from the desktop while also using the Panoramic camera to broadcast the class.

Software Choices & Capabilities

Zoom (see our tools page) allows for recording videoconference sessions. To record a session via Zoom, an instructor would need only to start a meeting without inviting anyone else and hit the "record" button at the bottom of the screen. Zoom recordings can be captioned after the fact, once they are uploaded into Yuja and auto-captioned (and manually corrected) there. (NB: Zoom Cloud recordings allow for auto-captioning and transcript generation [i.e., a separate text file] after a meeting has concluded. However, Zoom Cloud is not an ideal long-term storage location for course videos.)

Class Management for Later Viewing

Instructors may choose to record the computer screen with slides, the classroom itself, or a mix of both during the class meeting. (It's always recommended to let students know ahead of time how recordings will be made.) If students ask questions or make comments, it's best to repeat them for the recording. Should a portion of the class be devoted to individual or small group work, the instructor can stop the recording and wait until the appropriate time to make a new one, thus creating smaller, separate files as opposed to a large file with a good amount of unusable footage in it.

Ongoing Storage and Access

If class meetings are recorded, the video file can be uploaded to Yuja for students to review for assessments or catch up on if they missed class. Yuja allows for auto-captioning and manual correction, and its videos can be embedded directly in Canvas. NB: the instructor must remain in the room after class while the Zoom recording compiles on the desktop computer before uploading the file to Yuja or another online storage space. This may not be feasible given the instructor's and classroom's schedules.

Broadcast and Record Class Meetings Remotely

For courses that do not meet on campus, instructors can broadcast and record class meetings using videoconference platforms. This video format may work best for courses that:

  • rely on remote delivery with live (synchronous) class meetings for content delivery and student interaction/collaboration
  • rely on a mix of instructor presentation and class discussion/interaction (from small group to large)
  • benefit from students being able to review class meetings, e.g., for an exam, for missed class meetings (NB: applies to recording option only)
  • involve students in different times zones, with scheduling difficulties, or who encounter barriers to attending class meetings in person (NB: applies to recording option only)

Personal Laptop or Desktop

Summary

The most flexible and DIY option for delivering a course remotely, this involves hosting a videoconference (e.g., via Zoom or Teams) via either a laptop or desktop computer. From large lectures to small seminars, instructors can engage students and facilitate meaningful class meetings.

Hardware Setup & Capabilities

It's advisable to connect directly to a power source to avoid accidental battery drain/shutdown, and to close out of unnecessary applications that compete for processing and memory bandwidth. (It's also recommended to quit and log out of applications that might generate unwanted notifications or make an unwanted appearance during a screen share.)

Peripherals can enhance this setup in the way of (1) an external webcam that is positioned to catch a better view of the instructor, and (2) an external microphone that allows for more clarity/quality of sound (with a reduction in the ambient noise that a built-in microphone detects). For tips on enhancing the lighting from a remote environment, see the tutorial below.

title card for lighting in a home office video

 

 

 

 

Software Choices & Capabilities

Zoom and Microsoft Teams (see our tools page) allow for videoconference hosting of remote classes. Both share similar functionalities; the choice depends largely on personal preference and, to a certain degree, class management needs. In terms of similarities, both platforms allow for video and audio streaming, live chat features, file sharing, screen sharing, and virtual whiteboard. Both are free of charge to UK students, staff, and faculty. Recent security updates in Zoom have responded to issues that emerged early in the transition to remote learning (e.g., "Zoombombing").

In terms of differences, Zoom may represent more of a quick-and-easy way to host video streams, while the video capability of Teams is part of a more robust platform that allows for collaboration in a way that combines aspects of Google Drive and Slack. A clear advantage for Teams is accessibility, as it offers live auto-captioning while Zoom does not. Zoom streams can be captioned after the fact, however, once they are uploaded into Yuja and auto-captioned (and manually corrected) there. (NB: Zoom Cloud recordings allow for auto-captioning and transcript generation [i.e., a separate text file] after a meeting has concluded. However, Zoom Cloud is not an ideal long-term storage location for course videos.)

Student Engagement and Class Management

For larger classes, it may make more sense to use the text-based chat feature exclusively for remote student engagement given the complexities of managing audio/video channels. These sorts of expectations ought to be explained clearly in the syllabus and at regular intervals during the semester. Smaller classes may elect to use both text and audio/video channels given that students have been prepared for structured ways of interacting. For example, the expectation might be set that an instructor will cue opportunities for verbal questions/comments, and manage the discussion using the "raise hand" feature in the participant list.

The instructor can take pauses at regular intervals to check the chat for questions and participant list for raised hands. If the course has a TA, the TA can monitor the chat and list, perhaps responding to some text-based questions in the moment without instructor intervention and bringing other questions to the group's attention during the appropriate times. If the course has no TA, consider establishing a system of rotating responsibility for monitoring the chat and participant list, either by individual students or in small groups, as part of class participation. Either way, encouraging students to respond to each other in the chat (as a sort of public backchannel) and to think of themselves as each other's advocates can bolster engagement and community in the class.

In addition, the instructor may use polling and breakout room features. A wide array of external apps and platform provide even more options for student collaboration and active learning (e.g., Google apps).

Ongoing Storage and Access

If class meetings are recorded, the video file can be uploaded to Yuja for students to review for assessments or catch up on if they missed class. Yuja allows for auto-captioning and manual correction, and its videos can be embedded directly in Canvas.

Accessibility, Privacy, and Intellectual Property

Video platforms can engage students remotely and provide a lasting opportunity for viewing and reviewing classroom material. Especially when individual students may experience interruptions in their lives and schedules, providing as many avenues to keep up or catch up is critical for an equitable education this fall. However, digital video brings additional considerations for accessibility, student and instructor privacy, and the instructor's intellectual property.

Accessibility

Making video content accessible benefits all students, including those with visual, auditory, and other disabilities. More broadly, adding captions and/or transcripts to video content allows all students to review class material in multiple modes (i.e., audio/visual as well as textual), which can be effective for learning. Moreover, this can allow students to review material while they're unable to use audio/video modes, whether because of technical capabilities, issues, or bandwidth, or because of complications in the learning environment. Lastly, this also benefits English language learners, as well as students who feel more comfortable learning from text.

Auto-Captioning with Manual Correction in Yuja

Because Yuja is the University's primary video hosting service, it may make the most sense to store and caption all video content there. All videos can be auto-captioned in Yuja with manual correction. The correction is critical given that the auto-captioning software, while much more accurate than it has been in the past, will interpret voices and speech patterns differently and have difficulty with specialized, technical, and non-English language. See the tutorial below for adding captions to Yuja.

title card for video on adding captions in yuja

 

 

 

 

 

Accessibility Comparison of Video Platforms

For the following comparison, "transcript" refers to a separate file that usually does not include timestamps, while "captions" refer to language that displays sequentially in sync with the video content.

Echo360 Classroom Capture: Transcript

MS Teams: Auto-Captioning (live only, does not save with video file)

Yuja: Auto-Captioning with Manual Correction + Transcript

Zoom Cloud Recording: Auto-Captioning + Transcript

Privacy

Instructor Rights & Student Responsibilities at UK

While smartphones and other devices have long enabled students and instructors to record class meetings and other course materials, the addition of digital video and remote delivery options provide more avenues for saving, sharing, and manipulating media objects. Student and instructor privacy is a critical concern for maintaining a trusting, inclusive, safe, and productive learning environment. Unfortunately, there will always be ways that course materials may be captured and shared. However, the existing Administrative Regulations and Student Code of Conduct place the ownership of course materials squarely with the faculty, and affirm that instructor's right to manage how all technology is used in the context of a course. Per Senate Council:

"As is the case for in-person classes, faculty have the right to set their own policies for appropriate classroom behavior and use of electronic equipment during classes offered online or through other alternative delivery methods. Instructors of record can make clear the expectation that class discussions and other materials, even when delivered online, are not to be shared outside of the class. According to the Student Code of Conduct, instructors are permitted to prohibit disruptive behavior and the disruptive use of electronic equipment in their classes. Faculty may clarify in a supplemental statement to the syllabus that students cannot record or share recordings of online class meetings, nor share other materials distributed as part of the class."

It is always a good idea to establish class technology and recording expectations in the syllabus, and discuss them openly with students (for example, an intentional conversation or activity about how to create safe conditions for all to participate freely and equitably in the class).

FERPA & Student Permissions 

On March 30, 2020, the U.S. Department of Education’s Student Privacy Policy Office (SPPO) issued guidance regarding FERPA and virtual learning.  Per the SPPO:

  • It is permissible under FERPA to record classes and share the recording of the virtual class to students who were unable to attend or for students to re-watch.  
  • A recording of a whole class lesson is not generally considered an education record for a specific student and should not be maintained in a specific student’s records.  
  • The recording should only be shared through a system that is accessible only to the class members.  
  • The instructor must take care not to disclose personally identifiable information (“PII”) from student education records during a virtual lesson unless written permission has been provided to do so.  
  • Instructors should notify students that the class is being recorded and the purpose for the recording, such as "Our class sessions will all be audiovisually recorded for students in the class to refer back and for enrolled students who are unable to attend live.”

To share or use recordings outside of the specific course (e.g., for another class, during a subsequent semester), written permission should be obtained from students who can be identified in the recording. The request for permission should specify how the recording will be reused, e.g., for other classes at UK but not to shared beyond those classes. Alternatively, if portions of recordings with identifiable students may be cut from the video without compromising the instructional value, no permission is necessary.

Terms of Service and User Agreements

The Echo360 end user agreement may be viewed at any time in the Echo360 software by clicking on the gear icon and selecting "legal" from the drop-down menu. Although Echo360 is not primarily intended to record students, there are times when student images or voices do appear on the recording. Such instances might include class presentations, full class discussions, or other class activities. Consent is not required as long as access to the recording of the class is limited to the students enrolled in the class. If the instructor wants to use the recorded class to show to other students, such as in the next semester, then a FERPA release would be needed from any students who are identifiable in the recording(s).

For information on Zoom, see its legal and privacy page, as well as its terms of service.

Intellectual Property

All instructional material is considered to be the intellectual property of the instructor, who may determine if and how that material may be used, shared, and modified. Per Senate Council:

"Administrative Regulation 7:6 provides information regarding faculty rights with respect to the “traditional products of scholarly activity.”  The AR makes clear that such products, which include course materials, are the property of the faculty.  The recorded lectures, live online discussions, digital materials, or other course materials that faculty prepare in order to teach their courses via online and other alternative delivery methods in response to the emergency created by COVID-19 will be governed by AR 7:6, and will remain the unrestricted property of the faculty who produce them."

Syllabus Language

The following language has been approved by Senate Council for use and adaptation in syllabi at UK regarding the use of video recordings and other course content.

Class Recording Notification 

The University of Kentucky Student Code of Conduct defines Invasion of Privacy as using electronic or other devices to make a photographic, audio, or video record of any person without their prior knowledge or consent when such a recording is likely to cause injury or distress. 

Meetings of this course may be recorded. All video and audio recordings of lecturers and class meetings, provided by the instructors, are for educational use by students in this class only. They are available only through the Canvas shell for this course and are not to be copied, shared, or redistributed.   

As addressed in the Student Code of Conduct, students are expected to follow appropriate university policies and maintain the security of linkblue accounts used to access recorded class materials. Recordings may not be reproduced, shared with those not enrolled in the class, or uploaded to other online environments.  

If the instructor or a University of Kentucky office plans any other uses for the recordings, beyond this class, students identifiable in the recordings will be notified to request consent prior to such use. In anticipation of such cases, students may be asked to complete an “authorization of use” form by a faculty member. 

Video and audio recordings by students are not permitted during the class unless the student has received prior permission from the instructor. Any sharing, distribution, and or uploading of these recordings outside of the parameters of the class is prohibited. Students with specific recording accommodations approved by the Disability Resource Center should present their official documentation to the instructor. 

All content for this course, including handouts, assignments, and PowerPoint lectures are the intellectual property of the instructors and cannot be reproduced or sold without prior permission from the instructors. A student may use the material for reasonable educational and professional purposes extending beyond this class, such as studying for a comprehensive or qualifying examination in a degree program, preparing for a professional or certification examination, or to assist in fulfilling responsibilities at a job or internship.